A general rule of thumb told about investing in the stock market is that an individual investor should have no more than 10-12 stocks in their investment portfolio. If you try to own and manage more than a dozen stocks you’ll be missing important details and lose out when you should have bought or sold.

I’m not convinced that rule applies to a “buy and hold” investor like me. I typically buy stock to keep for 5-10 years or more. I am not trying to sell on the peaks or buy on the troughs (though it sometimes happens that I do). Instead, I am investing regularly and selling only when an investment has doubled in value. I want to own a stable collection of stocks that are steadily increasing in value.

I am taking a similar approach in Pay-To-Clicks.

I want a stable collection of PTC sites I am using to earn money, and I don’t want to be swapping in something new every week. In “My 6 Investing Rules” I shared some of my experience that relates to investing in Pay-To-Clicks, but did not talk specifically about my own portfolio of stocks. So let’s get into that a bit today.

NOTE: This article is part of a series titled The Amazing Tale of 4 PTCscomparing the ClixSense Paid-To-Click advertising service with three others — LeadsLeap, NeoBux and ScarletClicks. Join them all and follow along.

My investment portfolio currently consists of 20 different companies, including Apple, Google, First Solar, Facebook, NetSuite, Sandisk, and other “tech” stocks. I’ve focused on the technology sector simply because that’s where my work and interests are. I find all areas of technological development fascinating, and read everything I can about it. Tech is a constantly changing sector, and I’ve done very well investing there over the years. (And if you’re wondering… No, I did not buy Twitter. Not yet. :)

A PORTFOLIO OF PAY-TO-CLICKS

With the demise of EveBux and the lackluster performance of Hitzza, (both reported in my previous blog post The Good News and the Bad News), my “portfolio” of PTCs is looking kind of thin. We started with four core PTC earning sites and here on Day 84 we have five sites. So today I am pleased to introduce to you three more PTCs that I have been auditioning in the wings. These are:

Scarlet-Clicks – A PTC using the same script as NerdBux, so it will look very familiar to you. Launched in 2009, Scarlet-Clicks has an excellent track record of payments, though is not noted for serious money. (Minimum cashout is just 30¢.) I have clicked everyday for about a month and have earned 35¢ without upgrade or referrals. I took advantage of a 14-day Fixed Ad sale and got good results, so I will probably end up spending more here on advertising than trying to earn money.

WordLinx - Get Paid To Click

WordLinx – Based in the U.K. this text-link advertising system has been online since 2003, WordLinx is a venerable grand-daddy in the PTC space. Yet it seems fresh and simple in comparison with some of our other PTCs. Unlike most other PTCs, WordLinx offers permanent referrals for sale — you buy referrals instead of renting them. I’m not sure if this is a good proposition or not; I am still evaluating. I have not upgraded or purchased any referrals.

Ojooo – A funny name (how do you pronounce that?) for a well-run site from Germany. Ads are mostly english. I have had problems getting credit when I click on the Russian-language ads, so I simply skip those. Something you’ll notice at Ojooo is how many “premium only” ads there are, and they are of course the highest-paying ads. So Ojooo is clearly a site where it pays to upgrade. I immediately paid $39 for the upgrade.

One quick thing to note about the Ojooo upgrades — the $39 “Premium” upgrade is for a full year, and the $39 “Premium+” upgrade is for one month. I intended to purchase a one-year upgrade, but inadvertently purchased the one-month “Premium+” and it was several days before I realized my mistake. By then I was not going to get any profit from my $39 with no referrals, so I rented 30 referrals, and rented another 20 a week later. With 50 referrals, and the one-month upgrade, I may just break even.

UPDATED CHART OF EARNINGS

Our PTC chart now includes earnings from these three Pay-To-Clicks that I have added to the portfolio, along with the previous five.

Adding 3 More to Our PTC Portfolio

With the loss of EveBux and Hitzza, current earnings are down slightly, even with new income from Ojooo and others: $6.12 per day. Here are the numbers on Day 84:

Day 84
EARNINGS
$213.88
Day 84
CASHOUTS
$183.68
Day 84
INVESTED
$747.00
Days To Profit
at $6.12 per day
87 days

WHAT’S IN YOUR PORTFOLIO?

So how is your portfolio of PTC sites performing? Have you taken cashouts yet? Where are you focusing your investments? Feel free to add your comments below.

Are there other PTCs that are working for you that you’d like me to join and talk about here? Please don’t post referral links here (that’s generally frowned on) but you can reply to any of my emails and let me know what you think I ought to add to my portfolio. If I join under you, then my experience will become part of this story… and I’ll be helping you build out your own downlines. As you can imagine, it’s GOOD to have The Bear in your downline!

2 Responses to “What’s In YOUR Portfolio?”

  1. Tame Bear says:

    The guys at TimTech SOLD NerdBux on March 18, 2014.

    Please read the blog post I wrote about the events leading up to the sale: “The Rise and Fall of NerdBux.”

    Earnings have dropped off quite a bit after that… but not to zero. I am still logging in every day and clicking all available ads, and earning money.

    No, I don’t think NerdBux is dead yet, but TRUST — which is an important facet of business — has been significantly eroded.

  2. Tame Bear says:

    ATTENTION: As of the past several weeks, WordLinx is not paying, and I have removed it from my Core 4. Every time I try to cashout, I get this message:

    Cashout limit reached. Please try again later.

    I will spend my earnings there (about $15) on advertising, and stop clicking at WordLinx. I recommend you come to your own conclusions, based on your experience. But in my view WordLinx is an underperform. I won’t remove it from my portfolio just yet, but I won’t be using it unless I see some indication the situation has improved.

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